Saturday, October 06, 2007

6th of October

Today is the anniversary of the 6th of October War. It is also the day Khaled al-Islambouli became a hero, rest in peace Khaled.

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8 comments:

Ayman said...

Was Khaled Al-Islambouli a hero?

Wassim said...

Well in Iran he has a street named after him. Personally, I am no fan of Sadat because of the damage he caused, some would disagree but I think he was a traitor.

Amre El-Abyad said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Wassim said...

Sorry Amre, but I have to delete your comment, I'm just tired of your racist rants.

Ayman said...

I don't like Sadat. He might have been a traitor like all his counterparts in the Arab World. But he was assassinated not for the Pan-Arab or the Palestinian cause. His assassinators wanted to establish an Islamic state in Egypt. Their extremist religious ideology was not very different from the once used today to justify the killing of innocent people worldwide. Should we consider them heroes?

Wassim said...

I personally don't share his views, but I would be careful of lumping everybody who calls for an Islamic state in Egypt firstly as "extremist" and secondly as linked to those who kill innocent people worldwide today. I think the two currents opposed to the existing regime in Egypt, leftist and Islamist, may disagree with one another on the means, but both agree that Sadat had to go. I think Fouad Negm mentioned something about this in a documentary once. Like Negm, I don't have to share the ideology to consider Sadat's fate justified, but I won't stereotype the man and his beliefs either. That was not an easy thing for any man to do, neither was he the product of some "brainwashing" cult.

Ayman said...

Calling for an Islamic state is totally acceptable but using force and violence to achieve this is not.

Khaled Al-Islambouli was a member of Al-Jihad Al-Islami, an Egyptian militant group, that in addition to the assasination of Sadat, was involved in attempts on the lives of Interior Minister Hassan El Alfi and Prime Minister Atef Sedqi in 1993, the bomb attack on the Egyptian Embassy in Pakistan in 1995.

The Islamic Jihad of Egypt, to which Khaled belonged, was the main Islamic group behind the wave of terrorist attacks that shook Egypt in the mid 1990s. More than 1000 people, mostly civilians were killed during five years of unrest. Targets included policemen, government officials, intellectuals, tourists and Egyptian Christians. An attack in Luxor in 1997 killed more than 50 civilians.

Ayman Al-Zawahiri was the leader of this group until he joined the ranks of Al-Qaida and became its 2nd highest ranking leader. Khaled's brother, Mohammad Shawqi Al-Islambouli has recently joined Al-Qaida, according to news proudly announced by Al-Zawahiri in October last year.

Khaled Al-Islambouli has always been an inspiration for Islamic militants worldwide. Al-Islambouli Brigades is a relatively new Qaida-affiliated group that was named after him. The group claimed reponsibility for attacks on 2 Russian airliners (46 killed), a Russian subway station and an assasination attempt on Pakistani PM in 2004.

By the way, in an effort to improve relations with Egypt, Iran changed the name of Al-Islambouli street into "Mohammad Al-Durra Street" in 2004.

Wassim said...

Lak Ayman I love Wikipedia too :) Don't worry I'm not going fanatical on anybody! Anyhow, I worry about discussing such things like this so I won't say anymore but clearly there is much we need to discuss and in some depth one day!!